Monday, February 24, 2014
Monday, February 17, 2014
Thursday, February 13, 2014
Friday, February 7, 2014

arelis:

thecakebar:

Apple Pie Fries Tutorial {click link for FULL recipe & tutorial}

I’m crying tears of joy

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

findingneptunia:

lets-just-eat:

Ferrero Rocchierre Chocolate Cupcakes

Fuck Me Sideways and Bake these for me.

Then Feed them to me slowly. While we’re naked.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014
joshbyard:

Vertical Farming Growing World Wide

Vertical farms aim to avoid the problems inherent in growing food crops in drought-and-disease-prone fields many hundreds of kilometres from the population centres in which they will be consumed. Instead, Dickson Despommier – an ecologist at Columbia University in New York City who has championed vertical farms since 1999 – suggests that food should be grown year-round in high-rise urban buildings, reducing the need for the carbon-emitting transport of fruit and vegetables.
The plant racks in a vertical farm can be fed nutrients by water-conserving, soil-free hydroponic systems and lit by LEDs that mimic sunlight. And they need not be difficult to manage: control software can choreograph rotating racks of plants so each gets the same amount of light, and direct water pumps to ensure nutrients are evenly distributed.
The whole apparatus can be monitored from a farmer’s smartphone (see “Farming from afar”), says GSF’s R&D manager, Daniel Kluko. He says the new farm in Scranton will grow 14 lettuce crops per year, as well as spinach, kale, tomatoes, peppers, basil and strawberries. Its output will be almost 10 times greater than the firm’s first vertical farm, which opened in New Buffalo in 2011.

(via Vertical farms sprouting all over the world - tech - 16 January 2014 - New Scientist)

joshbyard:

Vertical Farming Growing World Wide

Vertical farms aim to avoid the problems inherent in growing food crops in drought-and-disease-prone fields many hundreds of kilometres from the population centres in which they will be consumed. Instead, Dickson Despommier – an ecologist at Columbia University in New York City who has championed vertical farms since 1999 – suggests that food should be grown year-round in high-rise urban buildings, reducing the need for the carbon-emitting transport of fruit and vegetables.

The plant racks in a vertical farm can be fed nutrients by water-conserving, soil-free hydroponic systems and lit by LEDs that mimic sunlight. And they need not be difficult to manage: control software can choreograph rotating racks of plants so each gets the same amount of light, and direct water pumps to ensure nutrients are evenly distributed.

The whole apparatus can be monitored from a farmer’s smartphone (see “Farming from afar”), says GSF’s R&D manager, Daniel Kluko. He says the new farm in Scranton will grow 14 lettuce crops per year, as well as spinach, kale, tomatoes, peppers, basil and strawberries. Its output will be almost 10 times greater than the firm’s first vertical farm, which opened in New Buffalo in 2011.

(via Vertical farms sprouting all over the world - tech - 16 January 2014 - New Scientist)

Sunday, February 2, 2014
prettygirlfood:

4-Layer Pizza Dip with Homemade Flatbread
6 ounces ricotta cheese6 ounces finely shredded Italian cheese blend (I used provolone, mozzarella and Parmesan)3/4 cup pizza or marinara saucepepperoni slices to cover the top
Preheat oven to 350°.
Spread ricotta cheese in an even layer in a baking dish with high sides (for deep dish version it should be no more than 6-inches across approximately).
Pour pizza sauce over ricotta cheese and spread evenly. Layer shredded cheese over pizza sauce. Layer the top with the pepperoni slices. Bake for 30-35 minutes until cheese is browned and bubbly.
Piadina (Italian Flat Bread)

2 teaspoons instant yeast3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour2 teaspoons fine sea salt1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil1/2 teaspoon baking soda1 1/4 cup water

In the bowl of a stand mixer with paddle attachment, stir together the flour, yeast and salt.

In a small bowl, whisk together the water and baking soda, then add the olive oil. With the mixer on low, add the liquid to the flour mixture and stir to combine to make a firm moist dough.

Switch to the dough hook on your mixer, or on a lightly floured surface knead the dough until smooth, shiny and elastic (about 10 minutes by hand, or 5 minutes by dough hook on medium-low speed).

Put the dough in a clean bowl and cover with a dish towel to let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour. Punch down or flatten the dough in the bowl and let it rest for 10 minutes.  While the dough is resting, start a cast iron skillet or griddle heating over medium-low heat for about 10 minutes until very hot, let it heat up slowly to avoid hot spots that will burn your flat bread.

Place the dough on a lightly floured work surface and divide it into 10 equal pieces. Roll each piece until about 5-6 inches across and roughly 1/2 inch thick. If the dough is still too stiff to roll, or pulls back, let it rest a couple of minutes before rolling.

Place one of the dough rounds in the hot pan and prick the dough in several places with a fork to prevent air bubbles. Cook the dough until golden brown on both sides, flipping several times while cooking. It will take about 4-5 minutes per round. Repeat with the remaining pieces until they are all cooked. You can keep the cooked rounds in a clean towel on a plate in a 200 degree oven to keep warm, stacking them on top of each other. This will help them stay soft as well. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Makes 10 round flat breads.

prettygirlfood:

4-Layer Pizza Dip with Homemade Flatbread

6 ounces ricotta cheese
6 ounces finely shredded Italian cheese blend (I used provolone, mozzarella and Parmesan)
3/4 cup pizza or marinara sauce
pepperoni slices to cover the top

Preheat oven to 350°.

Spread ricotta cheese in an even layer in a baking dish with high sides (for deep dish version it should be no more than 6-inches across approximately).

Pour pizza sauce over ricotta cheese and spread evenly. Layer shredded cheese over pizza sauce. Layer the top with the pepperoni slices. Bake for 30-35 minutes until cheese is browned and bubbly.

Piadina (Italian Flat Bread)
2 teaspoons instant yeast
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons fine sea salt
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/4 cup water
In the bowl of a stand mixer with paddle attachment, stir together the flour, yeast and salt.
In a small bowl, whisk together the water and baking soda, then add the olive oil. With the mixer on low, add the liquid to the flour mixture and stir to combine to make a firm moist dough.
Switch to the dough hook on your mixer, or on a lightly floured surface knead the dough until smooth, shiny and elastic (about 10 minutes by hand, or 5 minutes by dough hook on medium-low speed).
Put the dough in a clean bowl and cover with a dish towel to let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour. Punch down or flatten the dough in the bowl and let it rest for 10 minutes.  While the dough is resting, start a cast iron skillet or griddle heating over medium-low heat for about 10 minutes until very hot, let it heat up slowly to avoid hot spots that will burn your flat bread.
Place the dough on a lightly floured work surface and divide it into 10 equal pieces. Roll each piece until about 5-6 inches across and roughly 1/2 inch thick. If the dough is still too stiff to roll, or pulls back, let it rest a couple of minutes before rolling.
Place one of the dough rounds in the hot pan and prick the dough in several places with a fork to prevent air bubbles. Cook the dough until golden brown on both sides, flipping several times while cooking. It will take about 4-5 minutes per round. Repeat with the remaining pieces until they are all cooked. You can keep the cooked rounds in a clean towel on a plate in a 200 degree oven to keep warm, stacking them on top of each other. This will help them stay soft as well. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Makes 10 round flat breads.
Thursday, January 30, 2014
Tuesday, January 28, 2014
qualitytimewithflo:


100 AWESOME RAMEN RECIPES FOR STARVING COLLEGE STUDENTS… OR PEOPLE WHO JUST REALLY LIKE RAMEN.

here are a few ways to spice up your ramen-
Imperial Veggie Ramen includes scallions, bamboo shoots, green peppers, Shiitake mushrooms, kelp, and egg.
Spicy Ramen Explosion add cilantro, chili ramen, garlic powder and cayenne for a spicy snack.
Tex Mex ramen use ground beef, diced tomato, chopped onion and shredded cheese with your ramen.
Lime and Pepper Beef Noodles add lime juice, red pepper flakes and black pepper to beef ramen.
World Series Ramen make baseball-themed ramen with smoked sausage, sauerkraut, chopped onions and green peppers, and relish

click through for more recipes

Boss

qualitytimewithflo:

100 AWESOME RAMEN RECIPES FOR STARVING COLLEGE STUDENTS… OR PEOPLE WHO JUST REALLY LIKE RAMEN.

here are a few ways to spice up your ramen-

Imperial Veggie Ramen includes scallions, bamboo shoots, green peppers, Shiitake mushrooms, kelp, and egg.

Spicy Ramen Explosion add cilantro, chili ramen, garlic powder and cayenne for a spicy snack.

Tex Mex ramen use ground beef, diced tomato, chopped onion and shredded cheese with your ramen.

Lime and Pepper Beef Noodles add lime juice, red pepper flakes and black pepper to beef ramen.

World Series Ramen make baseball-themed ramen with smoked sausage, sauerkraut, chopped onions and green peppers, and relish

click through for more recipes

Boss

 
1 of 5
Next page